India 2.0-Jaipur

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Last stop: Jaipur. It was strange to arrive in this city, our last stop before flying home. The two weeks absolutely flew by, and miraculously, we didn’t have any travel mishaps, which felt like we had cheated somehow, this is India, after all. Something is going to go wrong. I contemplated this on our 5 hour train ride from Jodhpur-because you can’t come to India and not ride a train, which arrived 20 minutes late (so, on time) and mostly involved drinking a lot of chai and watching somewhat uninteresting landscape through the window. 

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India 2.0-Jodhpur

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Back to the city. Last time on my tour of Rajasthan we didn’t stop in the blue city, so I was excited to explore a new part of the region. We booked in at RAAS, a boutique design hotel nestled into the shadow of the imposing 15th-century Mehrangarh Fort. It was also next to a mosque, resulting in early morning call to prayer waking up most of the hotel (thankfully, we had earplugs). Ah, back into the civilization. 

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India 2.0-Sujan Jawai

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I’ve never stayed anywhere like Sujan Jawai. Though I’ve been on Safari, in Africa and India, my accommodations were never anything close to as unique as this place. Sujan Jawai really feels like it’s in the middle of nowhere. You can’t take regular cars there, instead you’re greeted a few km outside of the camp with welcome drinks and and a safari truck to take you in on winding dirt roads, or occasionally, over giant boulders where you question the truck’s capabilities. Once you arrive, you’re greeted with a champagne welcome, tour, and introduction to your luxury tents. The staff takes care of absolutely everything, but without a pretentious or stuffy air. It’s a pretty magical place.

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India 2.0-Narlai

1010320_984414084298_1837718870049106526_nTwo-three hours (depending on roads and cow traffic) towards what seems to be the middle of nowhere lands you in the tiny village of 6,000 residents. Though throughly cliched, “off the beaten track,” might be an appropriate description of Narlai. The reason to come here is to experience rural India, within the comforts of a world-class heritage hotel. No one I’ve talked to knew of this place, even those who holiday frequently in India, this added to the appeal. I found it through Truffle Pig (who arranged our honeymoon), and trust them entirely with any suggestion. It certainly lived up to all expectations.

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